Examining the Frontal Subcortical Brain Vulnerability Hypothesis in Children With Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Are T2-Weighted Hyperintensities Related to Executive Dysfunction?

TitreExamining the Frontal Subcortical Brain Vulnerability Hypothesis in Children With Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Are T2-Weighted Hyperintensities Related to Executive Dysfunction?
Type de publicationArticle de revue
AuteurRoy, Arnaud, Barbarot, Sébastien, Charbonnier, Valérie, Gayet-Delacroix, M., Stalder, J. F, Roulin, Jean-Luc, Le Gall, Didier
EditeurAmerican Psychological Association
TypeArticle scientifique dans une revue à comité de lecture
Année2014
LangueAnglais
Date2014
Titre de la revueNeuropsychology
ISSN1931-1559
Résumé en anglais

Objective: It was hypothesized that neuropsychological impairments in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) are associated with brain areas of increased T2-weighted signal intensity on MRI. Systematic and extensive examination of this hypothesis remains however scarce, particularly regarding executive dysfunction whereas hyperintensities are located preferentially in frontal-sub-cortical networks. In this study, we compared the executive functioning profile with characteristics of brain hyperintensities in children with NF1. Method: A sample of 36 school-age children with NF1 (7-12 years) underwent a detailed examination of executive function, including performance-based tests and child's behavior rating in daily life. Executive function measures were compared with the characteristics of the T2-weighted hyperintensities on parallel MRI scans. The presence, number, and size of hyperintensities in the whole brain were considered as well as their main cerebral locations. Results: Executive dysfunction including traditional cognitive and ecological measures in children with NF1 is not significantly influenced by T2-weighted hyperintensities, in terms of presence or not, number, size, and location, whether in the whole brain or according to involved specific brain areas. Conclusion: T2-weighted hyperintensities, as they are currently measured, cannot be used as a strong indicator of executive dysfunction in children with NF1. Based on the available NF1 cognitive impairment pathogenesis models, a critical discussion on anatomical-functional relationships between hyperintensities and neuropsychological profile is proposed, especially the executive dysfunction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

URL de la noticehttp://okina.univ-angers.fr/publications/ua10238
DOI10.1037/neu0000151
Lien vers le document

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365565

Titre abrégéNeuropsychology