Variability in Imaging Practices and Comparative Cumulative Effective Dose for Neuroblastoma and Nephroblastoma Patients at 6 Pediatric Oncology Centers

TitreVariability in Imaging Practices and Comparative Cumulative Effective Dose for Neuroblastoma and Nephroblastoma Patients at 6 Pediatric Oncology Centers
Type de publicationArticle de revue
AuteurMorel, Baptiste, Jaudeau-Collart, Anne C, Proisy, Maia, Leiber, Louis Marie, Tissot, Valentin, Quéré, Marie P, Mergy, Martine, Pellier, Isabelle , Vallin, Clara, Sirinelli, Dominique
EditeurLippincott, Williams & Wilkins
TypeArticle scientifique dans une revue à comité de lecture
Année2018
LangueAnglais
DateJanvier 2018
Numéro1
Pagination36-42
Volume40
Titre de la revueJournal of pediatric hematology/oncology
ISSN1536-3678
Mots-clésChild, Preschool, Diagnostic Imaging, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neuroblastoma, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Radiation Dosage, Retrospective Studies, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Ultrasonography, Wilms Tumor
Résumé en anglais

The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) from diagnosis and posttherapy computed tomographic (CT) scans performed on children treated for neuroblastoma or nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor) and to examine the different imaging practices used in 6 regional pediatric oncology centers between January 2010 and December 2013. We analyzed retrospectively the CT scan acquisition data in children aged 10 years or younger at diagnosis. The use of nonionizing imaging modalities was reported. The CT examinations of 129 children, with a mean age at diagnosis of 36 months, treated for 66 neuroblastomas and 63 nephroblastomas, were analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 28 months (minimum, 8 months, maximum, 41 mo). There were 600 CT scans, with a total of 1039 acquisitions. The mean CED from CT scans was 27 mSv (minimum=18.25, maximum=45). Abdominal CT examinations contributed 85% of the total CED. A median of 4.6 CT scans, 10.3 sonograms, and 0.4 magnetic resonance imaging examinations per child were performed. Our results suggest a reduction in radiation exposure but variability in the imaging modality choice and acquisition protocols. We emphasize the need for consensus and standardization in oncologic pediatric imaging procedures. When feasible, we encourage the substitution of nonionizing examinations for CT.

URL de la noticehttp://okina.univ-angers.fr/publications/ua18473
DOI10.1097/MPH.0000000000000915
Lien vers le document

https://journals.lww.com/jpho-online/Abstract/2018/01000/Variability_in_...

Titre abrégéJ. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
Identifiant (ID) PubMed28697171